Service Highlights
Service Highlights
10 Important Questions To Ask Your Advisor
10 Important Questions To Ask Your Advisor
A fiduciary is an individual in whom another has placed the utmost trust and confidence to manage and protect property or money. It is a relationship in which one person has an obligation to act for another’s benefit and make recommendations accordingly.

The financial industry is this strange meld of commission, percentage of assets, hourly and flat rate. Understanding how your advisor is compensated may help you determine if they are a good fit for your financial goals.

To keep it simple, focus on advisors that do not earn commissions only, but have the flexibility to offer what best suits your personal situation. They might charge a percentage of your assets, a flat fee for services or an hourly fee.

In addition to paying the advisor, you’ll face other fees, and you’ll want to know what they are. Some fees can have the potential to drastically reduce your savings.

Decide what services are important to you. Then make sure the planner aligns with your needs.

As an example, do you want holistic financial planning services that include tax and retirement planning, or are you looking for an advisor whose main focus is managing your investment portfolio?

In other words: How much access will you have to the advisor? You want to know how often you’ll meet and whether they are available for phone calls or emails outside of scheduled appointments.
It’s very important to ensure you have the same investment philosophy. Here’s why: The investment industry is one of constant change. You need to be able to trust the course that your advisor has recommended during both times of growth as well as more challenging times.

You’ve heard how important it is to be diversified, right? Your asset allocation is how you create a diversified portfolio.

You don’t want someone who is just going to only pick one type of stock. Your portfolio should include domestic and international stocks, and small-, mid- and large-cap companies.

Ideally, your financial advisor has hired an independent custodian, such as a brokerage, to hold your investments, rather than act as his or her own custodian. That provides an important safety check.
Advisors should use benchmarks that directly relate to what they’re invested in. If they do not, they need to be able to explain why they don’t.

Asking this question is a way of ensuring the advisor has your tax bill in mind when making financial decisions on your behalf.

What you want to know is: What do you get to keep after fees and after taxes?

Don’t forget that you’re paying for someone to clarify your financial life, not make it more confusing. If an advisor is not doing that, walk away.

How To Get Started
Get Started
How To Get Started
Get Started

Subscribe now to our newsletter

Contact Us
Contact Us

Contact us today.
We would love the opportunity to be your trusted advisor.

Contact us today.
We would love the opportunity to be your trusted advisor.